Universal Access To All Knowledge
Home Donate | Store | Blog | FAQ | Jobs | Volunteer Positions | Contact | Bios | Forums | Projects | Terms, Privacy, & Copyright
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload

Reply to this post | Go Back
View Post [edit]

Poster: Fairbanks 142 Date: Dec 29, 2007 11:26am
Forum: etree Subject: 16 vs. 24-bit FLAC

I am new to FLAC.....and trying to understand the process to upload my first show to the LMA, which I understand needs to be in FLAC or Shorten format.....I've converted a show from WAV to FLAC using FLAC Frontend version 1.7.1 (Etree edition).....I have read the FAQs here and on Etree for FLAC files, but I am still not clear on 16 vs. 24-bit FLAC. Looking at the Help file in FLAC Frontend, it looks like maybe encoding on setting 5 gives you 24-bit, and on setting 3 gives you 16-bit? Or is 16 vs. 24 determined by the source WAV files? I apologize if this should be obvious, but I'm trying to determine how to tell whether I have 16 or 24 bit FLAC files? Thanks!

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: Arrond_Wolf Date: Jan 14, 2008 10:05am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: 16 vs. 24-bit FLAC

Your encoding level (1 thru 8) has absolutely nothing to do with bit-depth. The way your PCM-wav bit depth is (in my opinion) best described: your amplitude (16bit-16 being the highest amplitude & 0 being silent-24bit 24 hi, 0 no output)
can give you larger dynamic range @ 24 bit as apposed to 16 bit.
I'm assuming that ( or hoping ) your masters are 24bit @ 48Khz or higher. Frontend will only encode a max sample rate of 48Khz. Unless the new Sonar Producers Edition has created the patch for 88.1 and 96 already, If your going to encode 24bit files.... there is no sense in bouncing or rendering a 24/44.1 to upload. Whom ever responded to this thread as well was correct. FLAC compression ratios are determined by the encode levels 1 thru 8. @ 1, it basically looks for any string of data that safe compression is obvious. @ 8 thats when your having it pick out 4 and 8 word length compression strings, resulting in a smaller file. Above level 6 your getting into the "virtually lossless" realm.

I don't know why Archive doesn't just allow CD-A redbook to be encoded w/ MD5 checksum to .ISO files for each disc?
I personally hate this derivatives streaming bullshit.
MP3s- I know everyone loves them, but why are you going to use a video codec to encode compressed wav. files?

N E way happy audiophiling.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: xtifr Date: Dec 29, 2007 1:43pm
Forum: etree Subject: FLAC doesn't change the bits

The number of bits is a property of the WAV (technically, a property of the PCM data stored in the WAV). FLAC is simply a compression program. It doesn't change your file at all; it merely compresses it. If you feed it a sixteen bit audio file, you'll get a sixteen-bit FLAC. In fact, that's the only way to get a sixteen-bit FLAC. :)

The -5 argument to FLAC simply tells the flac program how hard to try to compress the file. Bigger numbers cause the program to take a little longer and (maybe) compress a little more. (The difference, in my experience, is pretty negligible.) Since FLAC is lossless, the result, when you uncompress the file, is the same in any case.

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)